a day in the park

The weather as been perfect lately, and to be honest I’ve needed some quality time to relax, so last weekend I spent all day Sunday strolling around Fukuoka’s famous Ohori and Maizuru Parks. The ducks and turtles are out playing; and the wisteria and yaezakura are beautiful.

Lazying about the park can be tiring though, so after a few hours of doing nothing but trying to get the perfect shot of a turtle, I went to my favorite restaurant in Fukuoka, Evah Dining. It’s a macrobiotic vegan restaurant, but their meat alternatives are so good I dream about them. I can’t recommend it enough to both vegans and meat-eaters. Please check it out if you’re ever in Fukuoka! (I never did get my shot of the turtle though…)

 

I also took some videos. If you want to see what the parks and restaurant are like, check it out!

 

Spring in Japan

Last week was peak cherry blossom season in Fukuoka. I hadn’t really had the chance to do proper hanami (cherry blossom viewing) before this year, so naturally I did it three times to make up for all the years I’ve missed. I must say, nothing beats hanami season in Japan, especially when the weather is nice. Everyone packs up their tarps and barbeque pits, prepares food and drink to share, and heads out to the parks around Japan to soak up the beauty of the cherry trees blossoming flowers. I like to think people do hanami because they want to be one with nature and treasure this fleeting flower, but I think most people do it so they can get drunk in public in the afternoon. Either way, it’s my favorite season in Japan, and I am so glad I finally got to experience it in full.

 

By the way, I uploaded a cherry blossom vlog to my brother and my channel, Kori & Philip.

Sakura [花見のコーディネート]

昨日と今日花見しました!実は今年は初めての花見でした。いつも見に行くんですけど、今までちゃんと花見できなかったんですよ。ですから、この週末は最高でしたよー。

Yesterday and today the weather was so nice that I went to see the sakura twice! Before this year, I had never actually done proper hanami (cherry blossom viewing where you sit down and enjoy the scenery for a few hours), so I was pretty excited.

 

桜のほうに集中できるために、シンプルなコーディネートにしました。見てください!

I didn’t want to overpower the flowers, so I went with something simple for my outfit.

 

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Coat: Super Star (from Grapefruit Moon)

Top: One Spo

Shorts: H&M

Boots: Gift (from Texas)

cherryandjou

またね!

Where has the year gone?

Wow, I have become super bad at blogging. My job now is way more involved than my last one, so I have been a lot busier during the week and a lot more tired when I get home. On top of that, the last few weekends have been crazy as well! So here I am on a Sunday night minutes before going to bed filling you in on my little Fukuoka life.

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that delicious umegaemochi, famous in Dazaifu, Fukuoka

A few weeks ago, a friend from Kagoshima came to visit, and we had some great food and good beer. We also went to Dazaifu to try to see some fall leaves changing color, but it wasn’t quite the right time to get the full effect of 紅葉 (kouyou-autumn colors/leaves changing color). Regardless it was a nice weekend!

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too concerned with the margarita to worry about the flash

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Christmas…disco balls?

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all veggie and bean burrito mmm

The next weekend, some of my best friends in Japan came to Fukuoka! We all went out Saturday night to the exact same places I went to the previous weekend, but it was so much fun. On Sunday, some of us saw the amazing Big Bang and the Yahoo Dome. Big Bang is always great, but their new album is amazing, and this year they are all looking especially beautiful (ok, fangirl moment over). I really really missed my Kagoshima friends, I’m glad some of us were reunited in my new home!

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same Mexican restaurant, different people to enjoy it with

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we sneaked a few illegal shots at the concert

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a little bar called Cable Car in Daimyo

Last weekend, one of my favorite people on the planet came up for some personal business (but also sort of to see me). I also had my first 忘年会 (bounenkai-end of the year party…I’ve talked about this before) at my new job. It was at a swanky hotel in Hakata and although I couldn’t eat hardly anything there, I had a blast (mostly because I drank A LOT of wine and also because my coworkers are super cool). We had a little karaoke session afterward and my friend even got to meet my coworkers for a bit. My old and new lives combined. So good. On Sunday, we went to Ohori Park to see their winter illuminations (I don’t know…is that a real English word? They were Christmas lights…), and we had good long talks about everything. It was amazing to have most of my friends from the first leg of my Japan journey (who are still in Japan) come see me here. But I’d be lying if I told you it wasn’t exhausting! Keeping your apartment in shape for sleepover guests is hard, and having to be in a good mood for three weeks straight when you are me is even harder. I am so thankful for my friends though, and I’m so so happy I got to see them.

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I love where I am now. I am so much happier with my life and where it is going. But I do miss things about Kagoshima–and America. I miss all my friends and that feeling of community I had before. I haven’t been in Fukuoka very long, so I haven’t made a lot of close connections yet. Now that I’m eating plant-based, I miss American grocery stores that much more (haha…totally not important). I miss my family too, now more than ever I think. It may have something to do with the fact that I am not going home this year to visit, and I don’t know the next time I will be able to go home, but I also think it’s because I have fewer distractions now. Like I said, I am so much happier here. But now that I am so much happier and so excited for future possibilities, I’ve been thinking more about the other things that are missing. It’s almost Christmas, and I wish I was spending it with my friends and family back home, but I want everyone to know that I am doing super great here. Healthier and happier and just great. I will see all of you back in America soon enough. I promise you that.

Taking it Easy and Traveling Alone

The end of April/beginning of May is a wonderful time in Japan known as Golden Week, because of the many public holidays.  Half of the holidays are on weekends though, and there are working days in between holidays, so it’s only so exciting. I didn’t take any additional time off, but I did have a nice four day weekend to do whatever in Japan.  I decided to be completely uncharacteristic of my shy and needy self and went alone. Oh yes, I took a four day vacay all by my lonesome, and it was amazing.

 

Okay, so I did spend one night at a friends house watching trashy dating shows, but for the next three nights, it was just me, myself, and I…

I took a 4-hour bus ride to Fukuoka Prefecture and eventually made it all the way to Kitakyushu, a city in the northern tip of the island I live on. I didn’t have much planned, so I just wondered around the city for a few hours. If you’re going alone, slow walks through popular areas are actually really nice. When you’re alone and not in a rush, you notice so much more of what is going on around you. I did feel like people were judging me for aimlessly walking around alone, but after a while I JUST DID NOT CARE. I was on a date with myself and was completely absorbed in my own world.

 

 

Krispy Kreme!

 

One night I stayed in my hotel to watch a movie, eat Krispy Kreme donuts, and have a bubble bath. I learned that I need more bubble baths, but I probably could do without Krispy Kreme.

 

 

I do think it’s a good idea to see the city and what other people do there and then pamper yourself. But it’s also nice to get away from it all.  I left Sunday morning for the Yahata district of Kitakyushu and later got on a bus leading to the Kawachi Fuji-en  (wisteria park) tucked into a mountain side. The bus stopped earlier than I thought it would, and long story short, I was left to walk 4 kilometers with a woman older than my grandmother. I asked if she was okay, but she kept her pace better than I did.

on the way...

on the way…

We talked a bit through our tired breathing, and once there, she offered me tea, food, and her photography skills. Her kindness nearly brought a tear to my eye, and I am still thankful that we could spend an hour or so together.

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We lost each other after a while, and I spent more time wondering through the wisteria taking tons of pictures (including shameless selfies) and smelling those sweet sweet flowers for quite a long time. The park is up a hill and from the edge you can see a lake. Despite the crying babies and giggling couples, it was totally peaceful. And stunningly beautiful. And none of the couples walking under the hanging flowers made me want to vomit. Instead I was happy, that in that moment, they all seemed happy. Maybe some of them would get what we’re promised: a life of eternal love and happiness. I was just happy thinking of that possibility. Which is sappy and dramatic, but I guess that’s who I am now. Oh, Japan, how you’ve changed me.

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2014-05-04-19-22-17_deco IMG_20140504_135813 so pretty

 

After the marathon trek down the mountain and back to the train station, I headed back to the city and shopped. And then shopped some more. Boy, did I shop. I think I got all my therapy sessions in. Natural relaxation, retail, sugar…yup all there. How many times can I say amazing before it loses its emphasis?

mini treat-yo-self haul!

 

 

BUT you know me…I won’t lie to you. I did experience of few moments just short of existential meltdown. Being alone did make me realize that a lot of times I am alone in Japan, and though I do appreciate solitude, it is nice having someone you like around for the times you want to hear another person’s voice. I did experience moments of intolerable longing, moments where I thought I could collapse from all the injustice of the universe. But, I didn’t. If there was only one thing I could take away from that weekend it’s that I do like myself…I love myself, and though I wish there were times I didn’t have to be away from certain people, I know I can do it because I love and appreciate myself just as much as I love and appreciate them. Or more. I’m pretty alright, you know? I don’t think that’s conceited or narcissistic. I think it’s sort of necessary to being sane in a foreign country when you so often feel alone. Beyond that, it’s so so necessary for me right now. I’m glad I could spend a few days alone to help discover myself and notice all those things that have slipped by before. I highly recommend you do the same sometime. It’ll change your outlook. And, of course, it’s amazing.

 

Thanks for reading! Enjoy the warmer weather all you Northern-Hemispherians. That’s a word right? See you soon!

Japan Adventure: PART TWO

Boy, has this been a crazy two weeks months! Sorry about the lateness. So, where did I leave off? Kyoto. Right. After Kyoto/Osaka, we flew to Fukuoka via the ever-cheap Peach Airlines. We actually got in pretty late, and we were staying in a new hostel that closes its front desk at 9, so we got our keys from a little pouch waiting for us at the front desk. This place, part of the Khaosan chain of hostels, was super nice. Our room was a private double bunk complete with a shower and toilet! And it was well air-conditioned! I definitely recommend it if you’re staying in Fukuoka.

Anyway, we were really hungry, so we walked to Hakata Station and went to eat at the only Mexican food restaurant I know of in Kyushu. It is so good. We had some drinks and tacos and even chatted with the employees a bit. Despite the fact my brother knows zero Japanese, he managed to impress the waiter with his height and Spanish skills. Man, people here are awesome. If some weird giant who didn’t speak English went to America and try to do the same thing, he’d probably be greeted by squint-eyed stares and a few cold shoulders. Japan, guys. Japan.

After parting with our new friends, we headed back to the hostel and went to sleep. The next day, we took the bus to Dazaifu. Dazaifu is a pretty well know town in Fukuoka that has some nice historical sites and really delicious grilled mochi (umegaemochi 梅ヶ枝餅). We did get a bit lost trying to find some ruins, but overall I think it was a nice morning!

After Dazaifu, we went back to the city and headed to the beach! Fukuoka has quite a few beaches, but as we were without a car, we chose the most convenient rather than the most beautiful. Momochi Seaside Park is where we ended up, and it wasn’t actually that bad. But oh, is the beach scene in Japan different. Most girls were either fully clothed or wearing shirts over their swimsuits. The guys mostly looked normal I suppose, but most people were huddle under tents or drinking under canopies. That I can relate to. I will never understand going to the beach to tan, and I don’t think I’ve seen anyone do that here! It’s expected, but definitely different from what I’m used to. We hung out in the sand for a while, then decided to get out of the sun and get some food. As we were sitting down, a reggae-ish group came up to the stage and played a short set. With the food, the booze, the sound of the waves, and the music playing, it felt like a beach back home in Texas. I definitely got sunburned, but the nostalgia made it worthwhile.

After two days in Fukuoka, we headed home to Kagoshima. I was probably more excited to be in Kagoshima with my brother than in any other place. We got in on a Friday evening and met some of my friends in the city for dinner. I was actually a bit worried about getting back to Shibushi though, because I couldn’t drive and my car was at a shop getting inspected. My previous arrangements fell through, but luckily a very amazing person offered to give my brother and me a ride. We had to take the ferry from Kagoshima to the Osumi side, and the ferry terminal is not exactly convenient to get to from this person’s home. Not to mention it was getting really late. However, this particular person is pretty awesome and insisted it was no problem.

My brother and I made it back home, I set up his futon, I worried about him sleeping on the floor, he said a place to sleep is a place to sleep, he lied down, he said, “This is nice,” and we were out. The next day we picked up my car from the shop and went on a mini drive through Kagoshima and Miyazaki. I thought my brother would think the south was boring, but he loved it. He told me he wished we had just come here for the whole time. Kyushu is quite beautiful, but you never know what a 20-year-old boy will like.

After our drive, we headed to a city called Tarumizu to see my host family and go to a summer festival. We met at mom’s house and were greeted by many friends and a full temakizushi spread. They had unagi, y’all. Both my brother and I were in heaven. He did say it was hard for him to hear so much Japanese and not understand anything, but with good food and a lot of smiling, you don’t really need words.

Following dinner, we headed to the festival. The fireworks were shot from a platform in the bay, and the display over the water was perfect. I’m really glad he got to see Japanese fireworks and experience Japanese hospitality. I think I scored a few points on that one.

The next day, we headed north to Kirishima to visit the Open Air Art Museum. For a museum in the mountains of rural Japan, it was awesome. Just look at the pictures (coming soon).

I wasn’t able to take pictures of the gallery works, but they too were great.

It was so so hot that day, so we decided to spend the afternoon at a swimming hole/waterfall. I enjoyed it, but I think my brother felt awkward. He had experienced his first real encounter with “the stare” and it got to him. I can talk about this later, but it has never really bothered me. When it happens, my first thought is always, “is there something on my face?!” But for some people, “the stare” is soul crushing.

Anyway, we cleaned up and met my host family again for sushi! Again, my brother was pleased both with the food and the kindness of my friends. Afterwards, Yumi gave me a bag of small traditional gifts for my brother to send home. She’s a dream, I’m telling you. Perfect.

I don’t know what my brother did on Monday because I was gone at the prefectural driving center all day getting grilled about my seemingly fake Texas license (more on that later). That night we stayed a friend’s house near the airport and got up early for his departure.

My brother tends to be reserved in his emotions, but I feel like he had a good time. I know I made some planning mistakes and the trip could have been so much better, but my brother got to see a piece of my new life and that felt really good. Helping him out and getting us around Japan gave me more confidence in my language and communication abilities as well. And him being here somehow solidified that I do live here, and I could live here for quite a while.

After his trip, he told me he is dying to travel again and that he may soon be studying abroad. I’m just really proud of him, I guess. Not everyone has the means to go abroad, but at the same time, not everyone wants to. There are plenty of people completely content with staying at home forever. For me, traveling and living outside of America has taught me so much about myself and the world. I couldn’t imagine it any other way.

If you have the chance to travel, to visit a family member in another country, do it. Forget about the money, and just do it. There’s nothing better you can do for yourself, I think.